Australian Kids Are Being Coerced Into Making Online Porn

Australian Kids Are Being Coerced Into Making Online Porn

A fast-flourishing porn industry is targeting pre-teens and finding a multi-billion dollar market on the Dark Web, new research shows. Parents, we’ve

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A fast-flourishing porn industry is targeting pre-teens and finding a multi-billion dollar market on the Dark Web, new research shows.
Parents, we’ve got to talk.

If you’re anything like me, you think you’re doing the right thing to protect your pre-teens from online creeps.

But I know now, I have been getting it wrong.

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There’s a whole new big thing going on out there. It is targeting pre-teens. And it is finding a multi-billion dollar market on the Dark Web.

Don’t take my word for it.

The Internet Watch Foundation is an independent British agency supported by the European Commission. Its people spend their days trawling the web for images of child sexual abuse.

Its recent research found thousands of images of British children, almost all of them girls aged 13 and under, who are persuaded to perform sexual or sexualised acts on live-streaming services.

More than a quarter (28 percent) are aged 10 and under.

“The children were often completely unaware of the nature of the acts that they were being asked to perform,” the report’s author Sarah Smith told me from Cambridge, England.

THE DANGERS LURKING AROUND YOUR KIDS

Australia’s eSafety Commissioner Julie Inman Grant says similar incidents are showing up in Australia.

Paedophiles, who refine their grooming techniques through tutorials on the Dark Web, present themselves as children of a similar age to their victims.

The live-streamed content they encourage is then recorded and sold onto a secondary market that is staggering in its size.

Australian Federal Police Commander Lesa Gale says the now jailed Melbourne paedophile Matthew Graham was getting up to 400,000 hits a day on his website specialising in images of abused children.

“Unquestionably Australia is an active part of that market,” said Toby Dagg from the eSafety Commission.

In a twist from the traditional story of child trafficking victims overwhelmingly coming from poor backgrounds, the victims in these crimes chiefly come from affluent households. They tend to have their own bedrooms, access to devices and good internet speeds, said Smith.

What makes children do it?

It appears childrens’ hunger for affirmation from other kids on social media makes them especially easy to manipulate.

“It’s incredibly disturbing stuff,” said Smith.

“They’re almost seeing this as some sort of game.

“They’re being rewarded for performing a particular act by getting likes onto their profile.”

“We are seeing kids as young as four and five in bathrooms masturbating to camera,” said Dagg.

“They are aping what they have seen online or they are being instructed to do certain things.”

In some cases, he said, “you can hear parents’ conversations going on just outside the door. That’s how close they are.”

Eighteen per cent of cases in Britain qualify as Category A material, meaning the images are the equivalent of child rape and sexual torture.

But how can children be coerced into that level of self abuse?

“It’s an escalation process,” says Sarah Smith. “The child is blackmailed by that offender on the basis that the content will be redistributed if they do not consent to perform more and more severe acts.”

What can we, as parents, do?
“We need to arm our children with critical reasoning skills,” says Toby Dagg. But there are more direct approaches as well.

“Very often simple policies in the home, like where and when (a child) can use devices can ameliorate the risks and potential harm, says Dagg.”

There are also some useful tips at the eSafety Commissioner’s iParent site.

We can no longer say we weren’t warned.

Source: tendaily.com.au

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